Kraken CEO Jesse Powell Fires Back at New York’s Attorney ...

My Thoughts on the UnitedCorp (likely Calvin Ayre & Associates) Lawsuit Alleging Hijacking of the Bitcoin Cash Network by Bitmain Group, Bitcoin.com, Kraken and Bitcoin ABC Developers (TLDR: why it's complete horsesh*t)

So as I posted yesterday I'm now learning about a big lawsuit targeting allies of the Bitcoin Cash community, namely Bitmain Group (CEO Jihan Wu), Bitcoin.com (CEO Roger Ver), Kraken (CEO Jesse Powell) and individual BitcoinABC developers.
According to the linked news release: "the suit alleges that the Defendants collectively engaged in unfair methods of competition, and through a series of deceptive and unfair practices, manipulated the Bitcoin Cash network for their benefit and to the detriment of UnitedCorp and other Bitcoin Cash stakeholders. Their alleged actions resulted in the network losing more than US $4 billion in value as a direct result of the alleged hijacking of the network [...] UnitedCorp alleges that these activities are evidence of not only a violation of the accepted standards and protocols associated with Bitcoin since its inception, but a violation of US antitrust laws..."
Several points... Let's start with a simplification. I think it's highly likely the people behind this suit are Calvin Ayre and Craig Wright, given their stated desires and behavior surrounding the November 2018 hard-fork, and given they did not end up with an unofficial, yet recognized (software) leadership role for the BCH community, which is what they wanted. Apparently there is a video of a Kraken developer alleging secret cooperation between the suit's defendants.
First, even if there was cooperation it's permissible in both the expectations of cryptocurrency communities and weighed against U.S. antitrust law, and I'll explain why. Before doing so, however, I'd suggest if anyone finds disagreement with this view it may also, in the spirit of fairness, be useful to bring a lawsuit against CoinGeek (owner Calvin Ayer) and nChain (chief scientist Craig Wright) for possible similar collusion. I recall reading about resources from nChain and/or Craig Wright possibly setting up miners for CoinGeek Mining with potentially other strategic services which might include advice and/or even finance in an effort to influence the same events named in the UnitedCorp suit. It may likewise be good for these market actors to testify under oath about the extent of any strategic planning or possible collusion.
Part 1 - Cooperative behavior as alleged isn't improper for crytpocurrency communities
Now, let me illustrate why it wouldn't have been improper for any of the aforementioned to have communicated, planned or used strategy surrounding the November 2018 hard-fork. First, as regards cryptocurrency communities, the very act of strategic cooperation is encouraged daily in the form of "pools". These consist of individuals and companies around the world working together, specifically combining collective resources in the form of hash power, to attempt to "win" more blockchain blocks than competitors. The winning of these blocks comes with limited temporary control of some aspects of the network. It is not possible for anyone to have permanent control of the entire network unless they control all software-synced devices connected to the network.
The reason such cooperative activity is not improper is because any individual or entity can join with any other cooperating group! There is no advantage gained by attempting to keep secrets about who may be cooperating with whom, because in the case of some group becoming dominant (winning many blocks) anyone can join that dominant group if there is any public facing pool. More importantly total resources from the point of view of any outside competitor doesn't change, they are only merged, which doesn't lessen the share of blocks still available. Further, even a dominant group can never have total control over all aspects of the network, because several things of varying type make up a complete network, including software and computers and exchanges and other types of business as well as individual users.
Part 2 - Cooperative behavior as alleged doesn't run afoul of U.S. antitrust laws
According to Wikipedia U.S. antitrust law is: law that regulates the conduct and organization of business corporations, generally to promote fair competition for the benefit of consumers.
The key word there is consumers. The reason such laws exist is so consumers are not made to suffer. However, to be a consumer of something there must exist a product. Antitrust laws are meant to, for example, prevent consumers of canned tuna from paying higher prices in the market than they would normally pay if businesses acted as if they were completely cut off from each other. I use this example because this in fact recently happened with tuna in the United States.
Cryptocurrency is different. It's not a product made by businesses to be consumed. Cryptocurrency is the money itself. It's true the cost of the "money" can fluctuate. However, it would not be expected to fluctuate in direct correlation to varying entities working together in the manner indicated by the UnitedCorp suit. This is because the only result of such activities, whether brought about by conspiring or not, is the distribution share of blocks among "nodes" (entities running one version of software or another). However, any proper software will permit economic/transactional activity to continue. Further, the schedule of blocks is not impacted, and it's the schedule of blocks - how often new currency is introduced - that most influences market prices. Other factors influencing price can include speculative perception, such as whether or not a large business, for example Microsoft, makes a notable action with regard to the cryptocurrency; or whether or not entities controlling large amounts of currency on exchanges coordinate buying or selling. These represent the only applicable areas of concern about protection from collusion or useful advantage of secret information. Again, planning simply to attempt to have one group of software participants win a larger share of blocks than others does not generally have any impact on price whatsoever, again, because it doesn't alter the schedule of blocks.
The last point is everything about cryptocurrency is voluntary, including what software anyone desires to run, and whether or not they desire to participate anywhere in the economic system at any time. This means nobody can be forced to do anything, which directly contradicts a key allegation of the lawsuit.
This article is hereby placed into the public domain. Anyone is free to use any part or all of it for any purpose.
submitted by cryptos4pz to btc [link] [comments]

The Great Bitcoin Bull Market Of 2017 by Trace Mayer

By: Trace Mayer, host of The Bitcoin Knowledge Podcast.
Originally posted here with images and Youtube videos.
I just got back from a two week vacation without Internet as I was scouring some archeological ruins. I hardly thought about Bitcoin at all because there were so many other interesting things and it would be there when I got back.
Jimmy Song suggested I do an article on the current state of Bitcoin. A great suggestion but he is really smart (he worked on Armory after all!) so I better be thorough and accurate!
Therefore, this article will be pretty lengthy and meticulous.
BACKGROUND
As I completely expected, the 2X movement from the New York Agreement that was supposed to happen during the middle of my vacation flopped on its face because Jeff Garzik was driving the clown car with passengers willfully inside like Coinbase, Blockchain.info, Bitgo and Xapo and there were here massive bugS and in the code and miners like Bitmain did not want to allocate $150-350m to get it over the difficulty adjustments.
I am very disappointed in their lack of integrity with putting their money where their mouths are; myself and many others wanted to sell a lot of B2X for BTC!
On 7 December 2015, with Bitcoin trading at US$388.40, I wrote The Rise of the Fourth Great Bitcoin Bubble. On 4 December 2016, with Bitcoin trading at US$762.97, I did this interview:

As of 26 November 2017, Bitcoin is trading around US$9,250.00. That is an increase of about 2,400% since I wrote the article prognosticating this fourth great Bitcoin bull market. I sure like being right, like usual (19 Dec 2011, 1 Jul 2013), especially when there are financial and economic consequences.
With such massive gains in such a short period of time the speculative question becomes: Buy, Hold or Sell?
FUNDAMENTALS
Bitcoin is the decentralized censorship-resistant Internet Protocol for transferring value over a communications channel.
The Bitcoin network can use traditional Internet infrastructure. However, it is even more resilient because it has custom infrastructure including, thanks to Bitcoin Core developer Matt Corrallo, the FIBRE network and, thanks to Blockstream, satellites which reduce the cost of running a full-node anywhere in the world to essentially nothing in terms of money or privacy. Transactions can be cheaply broadcast via SMS messages.
SECURITY
The Bitcoin network has a difficulty of 1,347,001,430,559 which suggests about 9,642,211 TH/s of custom ASIC hardware deployed.
At a retail price of approximately US$105/THs that implies about $650m of custom ASIC hardware deployed (35% discount applied).
This custom hardware consumes approximately 30 TWh per year. That could power about 2.8m US households or the entire country of Morocco which has a population of 33.85m.
This Bitcoin mining generates approximately 12.5 bitcoins every 10 minutes or approximately 1,800 per day worth approximately US$16,650,000.
Bitcoin currently has a market capitalization greater than $150B which puts it solidly in the top-30 of M1 money stock countries and a 200 day moving average of about $65B which is increasing about $500m per day.
Average daily volumes for Bitcoin is around US$5B. That means multi-million dollar positions can be moved into and out of very easily with minimal slippage.
When my friend Andreas Antonopolous was unable to give his talk at a CRYPSA event I was invited to fill in and delivered this presentation, impromptu, on the Seven Network Effects of Bitcoin.
These seven network effects of Bitcoin are (1) Speculation, (2) Merchants, (3) Consumers, (4) Security [miners], (5) Developers, (6) Financialization and (7) Settlement Currency are all taking root at the same time and in an incredibly intertwined way.
With only the first network effect starting to take significant root; Bitcoin is no longer a little experiment of magic Internet money anymore. Bitcoin is monster growing at a tremendous rate!!

SPECULATION
For the Bitcoin price to remain at $9,250 it requires approximately US$16,650,000 per day of capital inflow from new hodlers.
Bitcoin is both a Giffen good and a Veblen good.
A Giffen good is a product that people consume more of as the price rises and vice versa — seemingly in violation of basic laws of demand in microeconomics such as with substitute goods and the income effect.
Veblen goods are types of luxury goods for which the quantity demanded increases as the price increases in an apparent contradiction of the law of demand.
There are approximately 16.5m bitcoins of which ~4m are lost, ~4-6m are in deep cold storage, ~4m are in cold storage and ~2-4m are salable.
(http://www.runtogold.com/images/lost-bitcoins-1.jpg)
(http://www.runtogold.com/images/lost-bitcoins-2.jpg)
And forks like BCash (BCH) should not be scary but instead be looked upon as an opportunity to take more territory on the Bitcoin blockchain by trading the forks for real bitcoins which dries up more salable supply by moving it, likely, into deep cold storage.
According to Wikipedia, there are approximately 15.4m millionaires in the United States and about 12m HNWIs ($30m+ net worth) in the world. In other words, if every HNWI in the world wanted to own an entire bitcoin as a 'risk-free asset' that cannot be confiscated, seized or have the balance other wise altered then they could not.
For wise portfolio management, these HNWIs should have at least about 2-5% in gold and 0.5-1% in bitcoin.
Why? Perhaps some of the 60+ Saudis with 1,700 frozen bank accounts and about $800B of assets being targetted might be able to explain it to you.
In other words, everyone loves to chase the rabbit and once they catch it then know that it will not get away.
RETAIL
There are approximately 150+ significant Bitcoin exchanges worldwide. Kraken, according to the CEO, was adding about 6,000 new funded accounts per day in July 2017.
Supposedly, Coinbase is currently adding about 75,000 new accounts per day. Based on some trade secret analytics I have access to; I would estimate Coinbase is adding approximately 17,500 new accounts per day that purchase at least US$100 of Bitcoin.
If we assume Coinbase accounts for 8% of new global Bitcoin users who purchase at least $100 of bitcoins (just pulled out of thin error and likely very conservative as the actual number is perhaps around 2%) then that is approximately $21,875,000 of new capital coming into Bitcoin every single day just from retail demand from 218,750 total new accounts.
What I have found is that most new users start off buying US$100-500 and then after 3-4 months months they ramp up their capital allocation to $5,000+ if they have the funds available.
After all, it takes some time and practical experience to learn how to safely secure one's private keys.
To do so, I highly recommend Bitcoin Core (network consensus and full validation of the blockchain), Armory (private key management), Glacier Protocol (operational procedures) and a Puri.sm laptop (secure non-specialized hardware).
WALL STREET
There has been no solution for large financial fiduciaries to invest in Bitcoin. This changed November 2017.
LedgerX, whose CEO I interviewed 23 March 2013, began trading as a CFTC regulated Swap Execution Facility and Derivatives Clearing Organization.
The CME Group announced they will begin trading in Q4 2017 Bitcoin futures.
The CBOE announced they will begin trading Bitcoin futures soon.
By analogy, these institutional products are like connecting a major metropolis's water system (US$90.4T and US$2 quadrillion) via a nanoscopic shunt to a tiny blueberry ($150B) that is infinitely expandable.
This price discovery could be the most wild thing anyone has ever experienced in financial markets.
THE GREAT CREDIT CONTRACTION
The same week Bitcoin was released I published my book The Great Credit Contraction and asserted it had now begun and capital would burrow down the liquidity pyramid into safer and more liquid assets.
(http://www.runtogold.com/images/Great-Credit-Contraction-Liquidity-Pyramid.jpg)
Thus, the critical question becomes: Is Bitcoin a possible solution to the Great Credit Contraction by becoming the safest and most liquid asset?
BITCOIN'S RISK PROFILE
At all times and in all circumstances gold remains money but, of course, there is always exchange rate risk due to price ratios constantly fluctuating. If the metal is held with a third-party in allocated-allocated storage (safest possible) then there is performance risk (Morgan Stanley gold storage lawsuit).
But, if properly held then, there should be no counter-party risk which requires the financial ability of a third-party to perform like with a bank account deposit. And, since gold exists at a single point in space and time therefore it is subject to confiscation or seizure risk.
Bitcoin is a completely new asset type. As such, the storage container is nearly empty with only $150B.
And every Bitcoin transaction effectively melts down every BTC and recasts it; thus ensuring with 100% accuracy the quantity and quality of the bitcoins. If the transaction is not on the blockchain then it did not happen. This is the strictest regulation possible; by math and cryptography!
This new immutable asset, if properly secured, is subject only to exchange rate risk. There does exist the possibility that a software bug may exist that could shut down the network, like what has happened with Ethereum, but the probability is almost nil and getting lower everyday it does not happen.
Thus, Bitcoin arguably has a lower risk profile than even gold and is the only blockchain to achieve security, scalability and liquidity.
To remain decentralized, censorship-resistant and immutable requires scalability so as many users as possible can run full-nodes.
(http://www.runtogold.com/images/ethereum-bitcoin-scability-nov-2017.png)
TRANSACTIONS
Some people, probably mostly those shilling alt-coins, think Bitcoin has a scalability problem that is so serious it requires a crude hard fork to solve.
On the other side of the debate, the Internet protocol and blockchain geniuses assert the scalability issues can, like other Internet Protocols have done, be solved in different layers which are now possible because of Segregated Witness which was activated in August 2017.
Whose code do you want to run: the JV benchwarmers or the championship Chicago Bulls?
As transaction fees rise, certain use cases of the Bitcoin blockchain are priced out of the market. And as the fees fall then they are economical again.
Additionally, as transaction fees rise, certain UTXOs are no longer economically usable thus destroying part of the money supply until fees decline and UTXOs become economical to move.
There are approximately 275,000-350,000 transactions per day with transaction fees currently about $2m/day and the 200 DMA is around $1.08m/day.
(http://www.runtogold.com/images/bitcoin-transaction-fees-nov-2017.png)
What I like about transaction fees is that they somewhat reveal the financial health of the network.
The security of the Bitcoin network results from the miners creating solutions to proof of work problems in the Bitcoin protocol and being rewarded from the (1) coinbase reward which is a form of inflation and (2) transaction fees which is a form of usage fee.
The higher the transaction fees then the greater implied value the Bitcoin network provides because users are willing to pay more for it.
I am highly skeptical of blockchains which have very low transaction fees. By Internet bubble analogy, Pets.com may have millions of page views but I am more interested in EBITDA.
DEVELOPERS
Bitcoin and blockchain programming is not an easy skill to acquire and master. Most developers who have the skill are also financially independent now and can work on whatever they want.
The best of the best work through the Bitcoin Core process. After all, if you are a world class mountain climber then you do not hang out in the MacDonalds play pen but instead climb Mount Everest because that is where the challenge is.
However, there are many talented developers who work in other areas besides the protocol. Wallet maintainers, exchange operators, payment processors, etc. all need competent developers to help build their businesses.
Consequently, there is a huge shortage of competent developers. This is probably the largest single scalability constraint for the ecosystem.
Nevertheless, the Bitcoin ecosystem is healthier than ever before.
(http://www.runtogold.com/images/bitcoin-ecosystem.jpg)(/images/bitcoin-ecosystem-small.jpg)
SETTLEMENT CURRENCY
There are no significant global reserve settlement currency use cases for Bitcoin yet.
Perhaps the closest is Blockstream's Strong Federations via Liquid.
PRICE
There is a tremendous amount of disagreement in the marketplace about the value proposition of Bitcoin. Price discovery for this asset will be intense and likely take many cycles of which this is the fourth.
Since the supply is known the exchange rate of Bitcoins is composed of (1) transactional demand and (2) speculative demand.
Interestingly, the price elasticity of demand for the transactional demand component is irrelevant to the price. This makes for very interesting dynamics!
(http://www.runtogold.com/images/bitcoin-speculation.jpg)
On 4 May 2017, Lightspeed Venture Partners partner Jeremy Liew who was among the early Facebook investors and the first Snapchat investor laid out their case for bitcoin exploding to $500,000 by 2030.
On 2 November 2017, Goldman Sachs CEO Lloyd Blankfein (https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-11-02/blankfein-says-don-t-dismiss-bitcoin-while-still-pondering-value)said, "Now we have paper that is just backed by fiat...Maybe in the new world, something gets backed by consensus."
On 12 Sep 2017, JP Morgan CEO called Bitcoin a 'fraud' but conceded that "(http://fortune.com/2017/09/12/jamie-dimon-bitcoin-cryptocurrency-fraud-buy/)Bitcoin could reach $100,000".
Thus, it is no surprise that the Bitcoin chart looks like a ferret on meth when there are such widely varying opinions on its value proposition.
I have been around this space for a long time. In my opinion, those who scoffed at the thought of $1 BTC, $10 BTC (Professor Bitcorn!), $100 BTC, $1,000 BTC are scoffing at $10,000 BTC and will scoff at $100,000 BTC, $1,000,000 BTC and even $10,000,000 BTC.
Interestingly, the people who understand it the best seem to think its financial dominance is destiny.
Meanwhile, those who understand it the least make emotionally charged, intellectually incoherent bearish arguments. A tremendous example of worldwide cognitive dissonance with regards to sound money, technology and the role or power of the State.
Consequently, I like looking at the 200 day moving average to filter out the daily noise and see the long-term trend.
(http://www.runtogold.com/images/bitcoin-price-200dma-nov-2017.png)
Well, that chart of the long-term trend is pretty obvious and hard to dispute. Bitcoin is in a massive secular bull market.
The 200 day moving average is around $4,001 and rising about $30 per day.
So, what do some proforma situations look like where Bitcoin may be undervalued, average valued and overvalued? No, these are not prognostications.
(http://www.runtogold.com/images/bitcoin-price-pro-forma.png)
Maybe Jamie Dimon is not so off his rocker after all with a $100,000 price prediction.
We are in a very unique period of human history where the collective globe is rethinking what money is and Bitcoin is in the ring battling for complete domination. Is or will it be fit for purpose?
As I have said many times before, if Bitcoin is fit for this purpose then this is the largest wealth transfer in the history of the world.
CONCLUSION
Well, this has been a brief analysis of where I think Bitcoin is at the end of November 2017.
The seven network effects are taking root extremely fast and exponentially reinforcing each other. The technological dominance of Bitcoin is unrivaled.
The world is rethinking what money is. Even CEOs of the largest banks and partners of the largest VC funds are honing in on Bitcoin's beacon.
While no one has a crystal ball; when I look in mine I see Bitcoin's future being very bright.
Currently, almost everyone who has bought Bitcoin and hodled is sitting on unrealized gains as measured in fiat currency. That is, after all, what uncharted territory with daily all-time highs do!
But perhaps there is a larger lesson to be learned here.
Riches are getting increasingly slippery because no one has a reliable defined tool to measure them with. Times like these require incredible amounts of humility and intelligence guided by macro instincts.
Perhaps everyone should start keeping books in three numéraires: USD, gold and Bitcoin.
Both gold and Bitcoin have never been worth nothing. But USD is a fiat currency and there are thousands of those in the fiat currency graveyard. How low can the world reserve currency go?
After all, what is the risk-free asset? And, whatever it is, in The Great Credit Contraction you want it!
What do you think? Disagree with some of my arguments or assertions? Please, eviscerate them on Twitter or in the comments!
submitted by bitcoinknowledge to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Transcript of DeSantis's complete tweet storm: #BitcoinUnlimited isn't dead, and the #Bitcoin network is *significantly* more centralized than it appears to be.

https://twitter.com/desantis/status/842935842545000448
1/ #BitcoinUnlimited isn't dead, and the #Bitcoin network is significantly more centralized than it appears to be.
2/ Earlier today, a group of twenty #bitcoin exchanges announced their hard fork contingency plans.
Bitcoin Exchanges Unveil Hard Fork Contingency Plan
3/ The exchanges revealed their intention to designate #Bitcoin Core as $BTC & #BitcoinUnlimited as $BTU in the event of a network split:
Since it appears likely we may see a hardfork initiated by the Bitcoin Unlimited project, we have decided to designate the Bitcoin Unlimited fork as BTU (or XBU). The Bitcoin Core implementation will continue to trade as BTC (or XBT) and all exchanges will process deposits and withdrawals in BTC even if the BTU chain has more hashing power.
4/ In addition to making an explicit request for strong replay protection:
We insist that the Bitcoin Unlimited community (or any other consensus breaking implementation) build in strong two-way replay protection. Failure to do so will impede our ability to preserve BTU for customers and will either delay or outright preclude the listing of BTU.
5/ To many (myself included) this appeared to be the end of the road for #BitcoinUnlimited.
Today is the day Bitcoin Unlimited died. -- Beautyon @Beautyon_
6/ It was made known that w/o 80% of the hash rate (BU currently is signaling at 32.4%) there'd be no fork.
There will be no #Bitcoin hard fork unless #BitcoinUnlimited gets 80% hashrate. Verified with largest Chinese miners this morning. -- Charlie Shrem
7/ Around the same time, the CEOs of Kraken & ShapeShift came out and clarified their positions regarding the contingency plan:
looks like a misunderstanding on my part. We do agree with the final document. One point of clarification: we make no commitments to the long-term ticker assignments of either Core or BU. -- Kraken CEO Jesse Powell https://pbs.twimg.com/media/C7KuDa7U0AA-w-P.jpg:large
8/ I still thought #Bitcoin was in the clear, but then I came across this video; watch the first three minutes:
9/ It turns out that while speaking at a National Security Conference in Beijing, John McAfee ran into the CEO of Bitmain.
10/ McAfee stated that China was "virtually in control of #Bitcoin," and that it would "bring them great control and power in the world."
11/ He went on to state that he'd cut a deal with Bitmain to create what they believed would be "the world's largest #Bitcoin mining pool."
12/ I started doing research; soon I discovered that last October, Bitmain signed a letter of intent with MGT. http://www.newsbtc.com/2016/10/27/john-mcafees-mgt-bitmain-launch-new-bitcoin-mining-pool/
13/ Last June, Roger Ver accepted the position of Chairman on McAfee’s newly-formed Cryptocurrency Advisory board.
https://bravenewcoin.com/news/john-mcafee-leads-cybersecurity-company-signing-up-roger-ver-and-erik-vorhees
14/ "Ver's first act as Board Chairman was to appoint Erik Voorhees [CEO of ShapeShift] to the company’s Cryptocurrency Advisory Board."
15/ On March 1st, MGTI announced that their pool would be fully online in the second quarter of 2017.
http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/development-completed-on-mgt-bitcoin-mining-pool-300416204.html
16/ On March 3rd, shares of MGT Capital Investments, Inc. jumped by 19.05%.
http://streetregister.com/2017/03/05/mgt-capital-investments-inc-otcmkts-mgti-shares-spike-19-on-heavy-trading-volume/
17/ On March 7th, AntPool (Bitmain) begins to signal support for #BitcoinUnlimited.
https://news.bitcoin.com/antpool-signals-bitcoin-unlimited/
18/ On March 13th, "#Bitcoin Miners Signal Revolt Amid Sluggish Blockchain" is published on @Bloomberg.
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-03-13/bitcoin-miners-signal-revolt-in-push-to-fix-sluggish-blockchain
19/ The article was immediately criticized for its #BitcoinUnlimited bias:
Understandable that Bloomberg have poor understanding of Bitcoin by talking to BU promoters. "BU Activation" doesn't actually do anything. – Samson Mow
20/ Found the website for MacPool; it's "under construction" & currently sporting a http://Bitcoin.com ticker.
http://www.macpool.us/
21/ It's probably worth noting that Ver & the CEO of Kraken go back as well:
A June 2011 hack took the site offline for several days, and according to bitcoin enthusiasts Jesse Powell and Roger Ver, who helped the company respond to the hack, Karpeles was strangely nonchalant about the crisis.
https://www.wired.com/2014/03/bitcoin-exchange/
22/ While BW currently isn't signaling support for $BTU, it would appear that they share facilities with AntPool.
https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=969823.0
23/ Forking at 80% isn't that hard when you've built a facility that would give you 75% over night:
So that’s potentially as much as 75% of the current Bitcoin hashing power in one place. A sane market would be selling right now. – Peter Todd, 2 Nov 2016
24/ A purely peer-to-peer version of electronic cash would allow online payments to be sent directly from one party to another without…
25/ ...the burdens of going through a financial institution. Digital signatures provide part of the solution...
26/ ...BUT THE MAIN BENEFITS ARE LOST IF A TRUSTED PARTY IS STILL REQUIRED TO PREVENT DOUBLE SPENDING. —Satoshi Nakamoto
27/ I'm now far more concerned w/ the viability of #Bitcoin's current proof-of-work algorithm than I am about the block size.
28/ #BitcoinUnlimited supporters now control http://Bitcoin.com , http://BTC.com , and the world's largest mining pool; wake up.
submitted by Ilogy to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

In case you missed it: Major Crypto and Blockchain News from the week ending 12/14/2018

Developments in Financial Services

Regulatory Environment

General News


submitted by QuantalyticsResearch to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Day-2: Here are combined contacts for Kraken. If everyone who reads this takes just 2 minutes to communicate their support for BIP148, we will be a force they can't ignore.

You can read about my full rationale here, but essentially (shills aside) we all believe in UASF - if we coordinate our efforts and pick one major wallet/exchange per day and bombard them with demands to support BIP148, we can make a real impact. Yesterday was Coinbase and it went great. Today let's target Kraken.
Here, I've made it easy for you:
Tweet to them.
Send them an email.
Write to them on Facebook.
Tweet at their CEO, Jesse Powell.
Ideally do all the above.
Let them know you support BIP148 and segwit. Let them know their users risk losing all their bitcoins if they do not. If you are a customer, let them know that you will withdraw all your funds unless they commit to supporting BIP148. Be polite, but firm.
No-one is asking them to support bip148 in exclusion to the legacy coin, we're only asking that, come August 1, they list bip148 coins, to give users the option to trade them. Supporting BIP148 is very low cost, so let them know how important it is to users.
If you've been out of the loop and don't know what all this BIP148/segwit/UASF business is about, to put it simply: Segwit is a technical change to the protocol that will provide a long-term solution for scalability, decrease transaction fees and stop ASIC Boost (a mining trick that gives some an unfair advantage). As (some) miners benefit tremendously from the status quo, they have blocked implementing Segwit. UASF/BIP148 is a new way to implement Segwit.
I highly recommend the following links to educate yourself more fully:
https://www.uasf.co
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QjZk7N7RXfA
https://www.weusecoins.com/uasf-guide/
https://medium.com/@lukedashjbip148-and-the-risks-it-entails-for-you-whether-you-run-a-bip148-node-or-not-b7d2dbe85ce6
https://medium.com/@elombrozo/why-i-support-bip148-4b4c0a9feb4d
submitted by thread314 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Cryptocurrencies are mixed as Kraken acquires European exchange for at least $100 million

Crypto Market Recap

Crypto Developments in Financial Services

Crypto Regulatory Environment

General Crypto News

Sources:
http://www.minci.gob.ve/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Gaceta-Oficial-Decreto-Constituyente-sobre-el-Sistema-Integral-de-Criptoactivos.pdf https://coin360.io/ https://coinmarketcap.com/ https://cointelegraph.com/news/amazon-will-have-to-create-its-own-crypto-in-future-binance-ceo-says https://cointelegraph.com/news/crypto-valley-assoc-pres-switzerland-must-be-open-and-easy-for-blockchain-investors https://cointelegraph.com/news/indian-govt-committee-is-worried-about-cryptos-impact-on-rupees-stability-report https://cointelegraph.com/news/kraken-buys-uk-exchange-crypto-facilities-for-at-least-100-million https://cointelegraph.com/news/twitter-ceo-jack-dorsey-still-believes-bitcoin-will-be-internets-currency https://cointelegraph.com/news/us-securities-regulator-solicits-blockchain-analytics-companies-for-data-review https://cointelegraph.com/news/venezuela-new-crypto-legal-framework-comes-into-force https://cointelegraph.com/news/venezuela-parliament-approves-crypto-bill-to-combat-financial-blockade https://twitter.com/cz\_binance/status/1091696602308259840 https://www.apnews.com/7997739035034979a615ec35d8008866 https://www.coindesk.com/crypto-kraken-acquires-crypto-facilities https://www.coindesk.com/venezuelas-crypto-exchanges-miners-must-register-under-new-rules https://www.fbo.gov/index?s=opportunity&mode=form&id=c18a03f93cf06df47dab8a1c1a7f87a9&tab=core&\_cview=0 https://www.newsbtc.com/2019/02/04/kraken-completes-biggest-crypto-deal-in-2019-massive-100m-acquisition-that-may-boost-european-market/ https://www.swissinfo.ch/eng/daniel-haudenschild-\_crypto-bickering-has-set-switzerland-back--says-cva-president/44731108 https://youtu.be/\_mP9OmOFxc4
submitted by QuantalyticsResearch to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

The wilkelvoss are trying to make bitcoin legit according to esquire magazine

Every idea needs a face, even if the faces are illusory simplifications. The country you get is the president you get. The Yankees you get is the shortstop you get. Apple needed Jobs. ISIS needs al-Baghdadi. The moon shot belongs to Bezos. There's nothing under the Facebook sun that doesn't come back to Zuckerberg.
But there is, as yet, no face behind the bitcoin curtain. It's the currency you've heard about but haven't been able to understand. Still to this day nobody knows who created it. For most people, it has something to do with programmable cash and algorithms and the deep space of mathematics, but it also has something to do with heroin and barbiturates and the sex trade and bankruptcies, too. It has no face because it doesn't seem tangible or real. We might align it with an anarchist's riot mask or a highly conceptualized question mark, but those images truncate its reality. Certain economists say it's as important as the birth of the Internet, that it's like discovering ice. Others are sure that it's doomed to melt. In the political sphere, it is the darling of the cypherpunks and libertarians. When they're not busy ignoring it, it scares the living shit out of the big banks and credit-card companies.
ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW
It sparked to life in 2008—when all the financial world prepared for itself the articulate noose—and it knocked on the door like some inconvenient relative arriving at the dinner party in muddy shoes and a knit hat. Fierce ideological battles are currently being waged among the people who own and shepherd the currency. Some shout, Ponzi scheme. Some shout, Gold dust. Bitcoin alone is worth billions of dollars, but the computational structure behind it—its blockchain and its sidechains—could become the absolute underpinning of the world's financial structure for decades to come.
What bitcoin has needed for years is a face to legitimize it, sanitize it, make it palpable to all the naysayers. But it has no Larry Ellison, no Elon Musk, no noticeable visionaries either with or without the truth. There's a lot of ideology at stake. A lot of principle and dogma and creed. And an awful lot of cash, too.
At 6:00 on a Wednesday winter morning, three months after launching Gemini, their bitcoin exchange, Tyler and Cameron Winklevoss step out onto Broadway in New York, wearing the same make of sneakers, the same type of shorts, their baseball caps turned backward. They don't quite fall into the absolute caricature of twindom: They wear different-colored tops. Still, it's difficult to tell them apart, where Tyler ends and Cameron begins. Their faces are sculpted from another era, as if they had stepped from the ruin of one of Gatsby's parties. Their eyes are quick and seldom land on anything for long. Now thirty-four, there is something boyishly earnest about them as they jog down Prince Street, braiding in and out of each other, taking turns talking, as if they were working in shifts, drafting off each other.
Forget, for a moment, the four things the Winklevosses are most known for: suing Mark Zuckerberg, their portrayal in The Social Network, rowing in the Beijing Olympics, and their overwhelming public twinness. Because the Winklevoss brothers are betting just about everything—including their past—on a fifth thing: They want to shake the soul of money out.
At the deep end of their lives, they are athletes. Rowers. Full stop. And the thing about rowing—which might also be the thing about bitcoin—is that it's just about impossible to get your brain around its complexity. Everyone thinks you're going to a picnic. They have this notion you're out catching butterflies. They might ask you if you've got your little boater's hat ready. But it's not like that at all. You're fifteen years old. You rise in the dark. You drag your carcass along the railroad tracks before dawn. The boathouse keys are cold to the touch. You undo the ropes. You carry a shell down to the river. The carbon fiber rips at your hands. You place the boat in the water. You slip the oars in the locks. You wait for your coach. Nothing more than a thumb of light in the sky. It's still cold and the river stinks. That heron hasn't moved since yesterday. You hear Coach's voice before you see him. On you go, lads. You start at a dead sprint. The left rib's a little sore, but you don't say a thing. You are all power and no weight. The first push-to-pull in the water is a ripping surprise. From the legs first. Through the whole body. The arc. Atomic balance. A calm waiting for the burst. Your chest burns, your thighs scald, your brain blanks. It feels as if your rib cage might shatter. You are stillness exploding. You catch the water almost without breaking the surface. Coach says something about the pole vault. You like him. You really do. That brogue of his. Lads this, lads that. Fire. Stamina. Pain. After two dozen strokes, it already feels like you're hitting the wall. All that glycogen gone. Nobody knows. Nobody. They can't even pronounce it. Rowing. Ro-wing. Roh-ing. You push again, then pull. You feel as if you are breaking branch after branch off the bottom of your feet. You don't rock. You don't jolt. Keep it steady. Left, right, left, right. The heron stays still. This river. You see it every day. Nothing behind you. Everything in front. You cross the line. You know the exact tree. Your chest explodes. Your knees are trembling. This is the way the world will end, not with a whimper but a bang. You lean over the side of the boat. Up it comes, the breakfast you almost didn't have. A sign of respect to the river. You lay back. Ah, blue sky. Some cloud. Some gray. Do it again, lads. Yes, sir. You row so hard you puke it up once more. And here comes the heron, it's moving now, over the water, here it comes, look at that thing glide.
ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW
The Winklevoss twins in the men's pair final during the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games. GETTY There's plenty of gin and beer and whiskey in the Harrison Room in downtown Manhattan, but the Winklevoss brothers sip Coca-Cola. The room, one of many in the newly renovated Pier A restaurant, is all mahogany and lamplight. It is, in essence, a floating bar, jutting four hundred feet out into the Hudson River. From the window you can see the Statue of Liberty. It feels entirely like their sort of room, a Jazz Age expectation hovering around their initial appearance—tall, imposing, the hair mannered, the collars of their shirts slightly tilted—but then they just slide into their seats, tentative, polite, even introverted.
They came here by subway early on a Friday evening, and they lean back in their seats, a little wary, their eyes busy—as if they want to look beyond the rehearsal of their words.
They had the curse of privilege, but, as they're keen to note, a curse that was earned. Their father worked to pay his way at a tiny college in backwoods Pennsylvania coal country. He escaped the small mining town and made it all the way to a professorship at Wharton. He founded his own company and eventually created the comfortable upper-middle-class family that came with it. They were raised in Greenwich, Connecticut, the most housebroken town on the planet. They might have looked like the others in their ZIP code, and dressed like them, spoke like them, but they didn't quite feel like them. Some nagging feeling—close to anger, close to fear—lodged itself beneath their shoulders, not quite a chip but an ache. They wanted Harvard but weren't quite sure what could get them there. "You have to be basically the best in the world at something if you're coming from Greenwich," says Tyler. "Otherwise it's like, great, you have a 1600 SAT, you and ten thousand others, so what?"
The rowing was a means to an end, but there was also something about the boat that they felt allowed another balance between them. They pulled their way through high school, Cameron on the port-side oar, Tyler on the starboard. They got to Harvard. The Square was theirs. They rowed their way to the national championships—twice. They went to Oxford. They competed in the Beijing Olympics. They sucked up the smog. They came in sixth place. The cameras loved them. Girls, too. They were so American, sandy-haired, blue-eyed, they could have been cast in a John Cougar Mellencamp song.
It might all have been so clean-cut and whitebread except for the fact that—at one of the turns in the river—they got involved in the most public brawl in the whole of the Internet's nascent history.
They don't talk about it much anymore, but they know that it still defines them, not so much in their own minds but in the minds of others. The story seems simple on one level, but nothing is ever simple, not even simplification. Theirs was the original idea for the first social network, Harvard Connection. They hired Mark Zuckerberg to build it. Instead he went off and created Facebook. They sued him. They settled for $65 million. It was a world of public spats and private anguish. Rumors and recriminations. A few years later, dusty old pre-Facebook text messages were leaked online by Silicon Alley Insider: "Yeah, I'm going to fuck them," wrote Zuckerberg to a friend. "Probably in the ear." The twins got their money, but then they believed they were duped again by an unfairly low evaluation of their stock. They began a second round of lawsuits for $180 million. There was even talk about the Supreme Court. It reeked of opportunism. But they wouldn't let it go. In interviews, they came across as insolent and splenetic, tossing their rattles out of the pram. It wasn't about the money, they said at the time, it was about fairness, reality, justice. Most people thought it was about some further agile fuckery, this time in Zuckerberg's ear.
There are many ways to tell the story, but perhaps the most penetrating version is that they weren't screwed so much by Zuckerberg as they were by their eventual portrayal in the film version of their lives. They appeared querulous and sulky, exactly the type of characters that America, peeling off the third-degree burns of the great recession, needed to hate. While the rest of the country worried about mounting debt and vanishing jobs, they were out there drinking champagne from, at the very least, Manolo stilettos. The truth would never get in the way of a good story. In Aaron Sorkin's world, and on just about every Web site, the blueblood trust-fund boys got what was coming to them. And the best thing now was for them to take their Facebook money and turn the corner, quickly, away, down toward whatever river would whisk them away.
Armie Hammer brilliantly portrayed them as the bluest of bloods in The Social Network. When the twins are questioned about those times now, they lean back a little in their seats, as if they've just lost a long race, a little perplexed that they came off as the victims of Hollywood's ability to throw an image, while the whole rip-roaring regatta still goes on behind them. "They put us in a box," says Cameron, "caricatured to a point where we didn't really exist." He glances around the bar, drums his finger against the glass. "That's fair enough. I understand that impulse." They smart a little when they hear Zuckerberg's name. "I don't think Mark liked being called an asshole," says Tyler, with a flick of bluster in his eyes, but then he catches himself. "You know, maybe Mark doesn't care. He's a bit of a statesman now, out there connecting the world. I have nothing against him. He's a smart guy."
These are men who've been taught, or have finally taught themselves, to tell their story rather than be told by it. But underneath the calm—just like underneath the boat—one can sense the churn.
They say the word—ath-letes—as if it were a country where pain is the passport. One of the things the brothers mention over and over again is that you can spontaneously crack a rib while rowing, just from the sheer exertion of the muscles hauling on the rib cage.
Along came bitcoin.
At its most elemental, bitcoin is a virtual currency. It's the sort of thing a five-year-old can understand—It's just e-cash, Mom—until he reaches eighteen and he begins to question the deep future of what money really means. It is a currency without government. It doesn't need a banker. It doesn't need a bank. It doesn't even need a brick to be built upon. Its supporters say that it bypasses the Man. It is less than a decade old and it has already come through its own Wild West, a story rooted in uncharted digital territory, up from the dust, an evening redness in the arithmetical West.
These are men who've been taught, or have finally taught themselves, to tell their story rather than be told by it. Bitcoin appeared in 2008—westward ho!—a little dot on the horizon of the Internet. It was the brainchild of a computer scientist named Satoshi Nakamoto. The first sting in the tale is that—to this very day—nobody knows who Nakamoto is, where he lives, or how much of his own invention he actually owns. He could be Californian, he could be Australian, he could even be a European conglomerate, but it doesn't really matter, since what he created was a cryptographic system that is borderless and supposedly unbreakable.
In the beginning the currency was ridiculed and scorned. It was money created from ones and zeros. You either bought it or you had to "mine" for it. If you were mining, your computer was your shovel. Any nerd could do it. You keyed your way in. By using your computer to help check and confirm the bitcoin transactions of others, you made coin. Everyone in this together. The computer heated up and mined, down down down, into the mathematical ground, lifting up numbers, making and breaking camp every hour or so until you had your saddlebags full of virtual coin. It all seemed a bit of a lark at first. No sheriff, no deputy, no central bank. The only saloon was a geeky chat room where a few dozen bitcoiners gathered to chew data.
Lest we forget, money was filthy in 2008.
The collapse was coming. The banks were shorting out. The real estate market was a confederacy of dunces. Bernie Madoff's shadow loomed. Occupy was on the horizon. And all those Wall Street yahoos were beginning to squirm.
Along came bitcoin like some Jesse James of the financial imagination. It was the biggest disruption of money since coins. Here was an idea that could revolutionize the financial world. A communal articulation of a new era. Fuck American Express. Fuck Western Union. Fuck Visa. Fuck the Fed. Fuck the Treasury. Fuck the deregulated thievery of the twenty-first century.
To the earliest settlers, bitcoin suggested a moral way out. It was a money created from the ground up, a currency of the people, by the people, for the people, with all government control extinguished. It was built on a solid base of blockchain technology where everyone participated in the protection of the code. It attracted anarchists, libertarians, whistle-blowers, cypherpunks, economists, extropians, geeks, upstairs, downstairs, left-wing, right-wing. Sure, it could be used by businesses and corporations, but it could also be used by poor people and immigrants to send money home, instantly, honestly, anonymously, without charge, with a click of the keyboard. Everyone in the world had access to your transaction, but nobody had to know your name. It bypassed the suits. All you needed to move money was a phone or a computer. It was freedom of economic action, a sort of anarchy at its democratic best, no rulers, just rules.
Bitcoin, to the original explorers, was a safe pass through the government-occupied valleys: Those assholes were up there in the hills, but they didn't have any scopes on their rifles, and besides, bitcoin went through in communal wagons at night.
Ordinary punters took a shot. Businesses, too. You could buy silk ties in Paris without any extra bank charges. You could protect your money in Buenos Aires without fear of a government grab.
The Winklevoss twins leave the U.S. Court of Appeals in 2011, after appearing in court to ask that the previous settlement case against Facebook be voided. GETTY But freedom can corrupt as surely as power. It was soon the currency that paid for everything illegal under the sun, the go-to money of the darknet. The westward ho! became the outlaw territory of Silk Road and beyond. Heroin through the mail. Cocaine at your doorstep. Child porn at a click. What better way for terrorists to ship money across the world than through a network of anonymous computers? Hezbollah, the Taliban, the Mexican cartels. In Central America, kidnappers began demanding ransom in bitcoin—there was no need for the cash to be stashed under a park bench anymore. Now everything could travel down the wire. Grab, gag, and collect. Uranium could be paid for in bitcoin. People, too. The sex trade was turned on: It was a perfect currency for Madame X. For the online gambling sites, bitcoin was pure jackpot.
For a while, things got very shady indeed. Over a couple years, the rate pinballed between $10 and $1,200 per bitcoin, causing massive waves and troughs of online panic and greed. (In recent times, it has begun to stabilize between $350 and $450.) In 2014, it was revealed that hackers had gotten into the hot wallet of Mt. Gox, a bitcoin exchange based in Tokyo. A total of 850,000 coins were "lost," at an estimated value of almost half a billion dollars. The founder of Silk Road, Ross William Ulbricht (known as "Dread Pirate Roberts"), got himself a four-by-six room in a federal penitentiary for life, not to mention pending charges for murder-for-hire in Maryland.
Everyone thought that bitcoin was the problem. The fact of the matter was, as it so often is, human nature was the problem. Money means desire. Desire means temptation. Temptation means that people get hurt.
During the first Gold Rush in the late 1840s, the belief was that all you needed was a pan and a decent pair of boots and a good dose of nerve and you could go out and make yourself a riverbed millionaire. Even Jack London later fell for the lure of it alongside thousands of others: the western test of manhood and the promise of wealth. What they soon found out was that a single egg could cost twenty-five of today's dollars, a pound of coffee went for a hundred, and a night in a whorehouse could set you back $6,000.
A few miners hit pay dirt, but what most ended up with for their troubles was a busted body and a nasty dose of syphilis.
The gold was discovered on the property of John Sutter in Sacramento, but the one who made the real cash was a neighboring merchant, Samuel Brannan. When Brannan heard the news of the gold nuggets, he bought up all the pickaxes and shovels he could find, filled a quinine bottle with gold dust, and went to San Francisco. Word went around like a prayer in a flash flood: gold gold gold. Brannan didn't wildcat for gold himself, but at the peak of the rush he was flogging $5,000 worth of shovels a day—that's $155,000 today—and went on to become the wealthiest man in California, alongside the Wells Fargo crew, Levi Strauss, and the Studebaker family, who sold wheelbarrows.
If you comb back through the Winklevoss family, you will find a great-grandfather and a great-great-grandfather who knew a thing or two about digging: They worked side by side in the coal mines of Pennsylvania. They didn't go west and they didn't get rich, but maybe the lesson became part of their DNA: Sometimes it's the man who sells the shovels who ends up hitting gold.
Like it or not—and many people don't like it—the Winklevoss brothers are shaping up to be the Samuel Brannans of the bitcoin world.
Nine months after being portrayed in The Social Network, the Winklevoss twins were back out on the water at the World Rowing Cup. CHRISTOPHER LEE/GETTY They heard about it first poolside in Ibiza, Spain. Later it would play into the idea of ease and privilege: umbrella drinks and girls in bikinis. But if the creation myth was going to be flippant, the talk was serious. "I'd say we were cautious, but we were definitely intrigued," says Cameron. They went back home to New York and began to read. There was something about it that got under their skin. "We knew that money had been so broken and inefficient for years," says Tyler, "so bitcoin appealed to us right away."
They speak in braided sentences, catching each other, reassuring themselves, tightening each other's ideas. They don't quite want to say that bitcoin looked like something that might be redemptive—after all, they, like everyone else, were looking to make money, lots of it, Olympic-sized amounts—but they say that it did strike an idealistic chord inside them. They certainly wouldn't be cozying up to the anarchists anytime soon, but this was a global currency that, despite its uncertainties, seemed to present a solution to some of the world's more pressing problems. "It was borderless, instantaneous, irreversible, decentralized, with virtually no transaction costs," says Tyler. It could possibly cut the banks out, and it might even take the knees out from under the credit-card companies. Not only that, but the price, at just under ten dollars per coin, was in their estimation low, very low. They began to snap it up.
They were aware, even at the beginning, that they might, once again, be called Johnny-come-latelys, just hopping blithely on the bandwagon—it was 2012, already four years into the birth of the currency—but they went ahead anyway, power ten. Within a short time they'd spent $11 million buying up a whopping 1 percent of the world's bitcoin, a position they kept up as more bitcoins were mined, making their 1 percent holding today worth about $66 million.
But bitcoin was flammable. The brothers felt the burn quickly. Their next significant investment came later that year, when they gave $1.5 million in venture funding to a nascent exchange called BitInstant. Within a year the CEO was arrested for laundering drug money through the exchange.
So what were a pair of smart, clean-cut Olympic rowers doing hanging around the edges of something so apparently shady, and what, if anything, were they going to do about it?
They mightn't have thought of it this way, but there was something of the sheriff striding into town, the one with the swagger and the scar, glancing up at the balconies as he comes down Main Street, all tumbleweeds and broken pianos. This place was a dump in most people's eyes, but the sheriff glimpsed his last best shot at finally getting the respect he thinks he deserves.
The money shot: A good stroke will catch the water almost without breaking its seal. You stir without rippling. Your silence is sinewy. There's muscle in that calm. The violence catches underneath, thrusts the boat along. Stroke after stroke. Just keep going. Today's truth dies tomorrow. What you have to do is elemental enough. You row without looking behind you. You keep the others in front of you. As long as you can see what they're doing, it's all in your hands. You are there to out-pain them. Doesn't matter who they are, where they come from, how they got here. Know your enemy through yourself. Push through toward pull. Find the still point of this pain. Cut a melody in the disk of your flesh. The only terror comes when they pass you—if they ever pass you.
There are no suits or ties, but there is a white hum in the offices of Gemini in the Flatiron District. The air feels as if it has been brushed clean. There is something so everywhereabout the place. Ergonomic chairs. iPhone portals. Rows of flickering computers. Not so much a hush around the room as a quiet expectation. Eight, nine people. Programmers, analysts, assistants. Other employees—teammates, they call them—dialing in from Portland, Oregon, and beyond.
The brothers fire up the room when they walk inside. A fist-pump here, a shoulder touch there. At the same time, there is something almost shy about them. Apart, they seem like casual visitors to the space they inhabit. It is when they're together that they feel fully shaped. One can't imagine them being apart from each other for very long.
The Winklevoss twins speak onstage at Bitcoin! Let's Cut Through the Noise Already at SXSW in 2016. GETTY They move from desk to desk. The price goes up, the price goes down. The phones ring. The e-mails beep. Customer-service calls. Questions about fees. Inquiries about tax structures.
Gemini was started in late 2015 as a next-generation bitcoin exchange. It is not the first such exchange in the world by any means, but it is one of the most watched. The company is designed with ordinary investors in mind, maybe a hedge fund, maybe a bank: all those people who used to be confused or even terrified by the word bitcoin. It is insured. It is clean. What's so fascinating about this venture is that the brothers are risking themselves by trying to eliminate risk: keeping the boat steady and exploding through it at the same time.
It is when they're together that they feel fully shaped. One can't imagine them being apart from each other for very long. For the past couple years, the Winklevosses have worked closely with just about every compliance agency imaginable. They ticked off all the regulatory boxes. Essentially they wanted to ease all the Debting Thomases. They put regulatory frameworks in place. Security and bankability and insurance were their highest objectives. Nobody was going to be able to blow open the safe. They wanted to soothe all the appetites for risk. They told Bitcoin Magazine they were asking for "permission, not forgiveness."
This is where bitcoin can become normal—that is, if you want bitcoin to be normal.
Just a mile or two down the road, in Soho, a half dozen bitcoiners gather at a meetup. The room is scruffy, small, boxy. A half mannequin is propped on a table, a scarf draped around it. It's the sort of place that twenty years ago would have been full of cigarette smoke. There's a bit of Allen Ginsberg here, a touch of Emma Goldman, a lot of Zuccotti Park. The wine is free and the talk is loose. These are the true believers. They see bitcoin in its clearest possible philosophical terms—the frictionless currency of the people, changing the way people move money around the world, bypassing the banks, disrupting the status quo.
A comedy show is being run out in the backyard. A scruffy young man wanders in and out, announcing over and over again that he is half-baked. A well-dressed Asian girl sidles up to the bar. She looks like she's just stepped out of an NYU business class. She's interested in discovering what bitcoin is. She is regaled by a series of convivial answers. The bartender tells her that bitcoin is a remaking of the prevailing power structures. The girl asks for another glass of wine. The bartender adds that bitcoin is democracy, pure and straight. She nods and tells him that the wine tastes like cooking oil. He laughs and says it wasn't bought with bitcoin. "I don't get it," she says. And so the evening goes, presided over by Margaux Avedisian, who describes herself as the queen of bitcoin. Avedisian, a digital-currency consultant of Armenian descent, is involved in several high-level bitcoin projects. She has appeared in documentaries and on numerous panels. She is smart, sassy, articulate.
When the talk turns to the Winklevoss brothers, the bar turns dark. Someone, somewhere, reaches up to take all the oxygen out of the air. Avedisian leans forward on the counter, her eyes shining, delightful, raged.
"The Winklevii are not the face of bitcoin," she says. "They're jokes. They don't know what they're saying. Nobody in our community respects them. They're so one-note. If you look at their exchange, they have no real volume, they never will. They keep throwing money at different things. Nobody cares. They're not part of us. They're just hangers-on."
"Ah, they're just assholes," the bartender chimes in.
"What they want to do," says Avedisian, "is lobotomize bitcoin, make it into something entirely vapid. They have no clue."
The Asian girl leaves without drinking her third glass of free wine. She's got a totter in her step. She doesn't quite get the future of money, but then again maybe very few in the world do.
Giving testimony on bitcoin licensing before the New York State Department of Financial Services in 2014. LUCAS JACKSON/REUTERS The future of money might look like this: You're standing on Oxford Street in London in winter. You think about how you want to get to Charing Cross Road. The thought triggers itself through electrical signals into the chip embedded in your wrist. Within a moment, a driverless car pulls up on the sensor-equipped road. The door opens. You hop in. The car says hello. You tell it to shut up. It does. It already knows where you want to go. It turns onto Regent Street. You think,A little more air-conditioning, please. The vents blow. You think, Go a little faster, please. The pace picks up. You think, This traffic is too heavy, use Quick(TM). The car swings down Glasshouse Street. You think, Pay the car in front to get out of my way. It does. You think, Unlock access to a shortcut. The car turns down Sherwood Street to Shaftsbury Avenue. You pull in to Charing Cross. You hop out. The car says goodbye. You tell it to shut up again. You run for the train and the computer chip in your wrist pays for the quiet-car ticket for the way home.
All of these transactions—the air-conditioning, the pace, the shortcut, the bribe to get out of the way, the quick lanes, the ride itself, the train, maybe even the "shut up"—will cost money. As far as crypto-currency enthusiasts think, it will be paid for without coins, without phones, without glass screens, just the money coming in and going out of your preprogrammed wallet embedded beneath your skin.
The Winklevosses are betting that the money will be bitcoin. And that those coins will flow through high-end, corporate-run exchanges like Gemini rather than smoky SoHo dives.
Cameron leans across a table in a New York diner, the sort of place where you might want to polish your fork just in case, and says: "The future is here, it's just not evenly distributed yet." He can't remember whom the quote belongs to, but he freely acknowledges that it's not his own. Theirs is a truculent but generous intelligence, capable of surprise and turn at the oddest of moments. They talk meditation, they talk economics, they talk Van Halen, they talk, yes, William Gibson, but everything comes around again to bitcoin.
"The key to all this is that people aren't even going to know that they're using bitcoin," says Tyler. "It's going to be there, but it's not going to be exposed to the end user. Bitcoin is going to be the rails that underpin our payment systems. It's just like an IP address. We don't log on to a series of numbers, 115.425.5 or whatever. No, we log on to Google.com. In the same way, bitcoin is going to be disguised. There will be a body kit that makes it user-friendly. That's what makes bitcoin a kick-ass currency."
Any fool can send a billion dollars across the world—as long as they have it, of course—but it's virtually impossible to send a quarter unless you stick it in an envelope and pay forty-nine cents for a stamp. It's one of the great ironies of our antiquated money system. And yet the quark of the financial world is essentially the small denomination. What bitcoin promises is that it will enable people and businesses to send money in just about any denomination to one another, anywhere in the world, for next to nothing. A public address, a private key, a click of the mouse, and the money is gone.
A Bitcoin conference in New York City in 2014. GETTY This matters. This matters a lot. Credit-card companies can't do this. Neither can the big banks under their current systems. But Marie-Louise on the corner of Libertador Avenue can. And so can Pat Murphy in his Limerick housing estate. So can Mark Andreessen and Bill Gates and Laurene Powell Jobs. Anyone can do it, anywhere in the world, at virtually no charge.
You can do it, in fact, from your phone in a diner in New York. But the whole time they are there—over identical California omelettes that they order with an ironic shrug—they never once open their phones. They come across more like the talkative guys who might buy you a drink at the sports bar than the petulants ordering bottle service in the VIP corner. The older they get, the more comfortable they seem in their contradictions: the competition, the ease; the fame, the quiet; the gamble, the sure thing.
Bitcoin is what might eventually make them among the richest men in America. And yet. There is always a yet. What seems indisputable about the future of money, to the Winklevosses and other bitcoin adherents, is that the technology that underpins bitcoin—the blockchain—will become one of the fundamental tenets of how we deal with the world of finance. Blockchain is the core computer code. It's open source and peer to peer—in other words, it's free and open to you and me. Every single bitcoin transaction ever made goes to an open public ledger. It would take an unprecedented 51 percent attack—where one entity would come to control more than half of the computing power used to mine bitcoin—for hackers to undo it. The blockchain is maintained by computers all around the world, and its future sidechains will create systems that deal with contracts and stock and other payments. These sidechains could very well be the foundation of the new global economy for the big banks, the credit-card companies, and even government itself.
"It's boundless," says Cameron.
This is what the brothers are counting on—and what might eventually make them among the richest men in America.
And yet. There is always a yet.
When you delve into the world of bitcoin, it gets deeper, darker, more mysterious all the time. Why has its creator remained anonymous? Why did he drop off the face of the earth? How much of it does he own himself? Will banks and corporations try to bring the currency down? Why are there really only five developers with full "commit access" to the code (not the Winklevosses, by the way)? Who is really in charge of the currency's governance?
Perhaps the most pressing issue at hand is that of scaling, which has caused what amounts to a civil war among followers. A maximum block size of one megabyte has been imposed on the chain, sort of like a built-in artificial dampener to keep bitcoin punk rock. That's not nearly enough capacity for the number of transactions that would take place in future visions. In years to come, there could be massive backlogs and outages that could create instant financial panic. Bitcoin's most influential leaders are haggling over what will happen. Will bitcoin maintain its decentralized status, or will it go legit and open up to infinite transactions? And if it goes legit, where's the punk?
The issues are ongoing—and they might very well take bitcoin down, but the Winklevosses don't think so. They have seen internal disputes before. They've refrained from taking a public stance mostly because they know that there are a lot of other very smart people in bitcoin who are aware that crisis often builds consensus. "We're in this for the long haul," says Tyler. "We're the first batter in the first inning."
GILLIAN LAUB The waiter comes across and asks them, bizarrely, if they're twins. They nod politely. Who was born first? They've heard it a million times and their answer is always the same: Neither of them—they were born cesarean. Cameron looks older, says the waiter. Tyler grins. Normally it's the other way around, says Cameron, grinning back. Do you ever fight? asks the waiter. Every now and then, they say. But not over this, not over the future.
Heraclitus was wrong. You can, in fact, step in the same river twice. In the beginning you went to the shed. No electricity there, no heat, just a giant tub where you simulated the river. You could only do eleven strokes. But there was something about the repetition, the difference, even the monotony, that hooked you. After a while it wasn't an abandoned shed anymore. College gyms, national training centers. Bigger buildings. High ceilings. AC. Doctors and trainers. Monitors hooked up to your heart, your head, your blood. Six foot five, but even then you were not as tall as the other guys. You liked the notion of underdog. Everyone called you the opposite. The rich kids. The privileged ones. To hell with that. They don't know us, who we are, where we came from. Some of the biggest chips rest on the shoulders of those with the least to lose. Six foot five times two makes just about thirteen feet. You sit in the erg and you stare ahead. Day in, day out. One thousand strokes, two thousand. You work with the very best. You even train with the Navy SEALs. It touches that American part of you. The sentiment, the false optimism. When the oil fields are burning, you even think, I'll go there with them. But you stay in the boat. You want that other flag rising. That's what you aim for. You don't win but you get close. Afterward there are planes, galas, regattas, magazine spreads, but you always come back to that early river. The cold. The fierceness. The heron. Like it or not, you're never going to get off the water—that's just the fact of the matter, it's always going to be there. Hard to admit it, but once you were wrong. You got out of the boat and you haggled over who made it. You lost that one, hard. You might lose this one, too, but then again it just might be the original arc that you're stepping toward. So you return, then. You rise before dark. You drag your carcass along Broadway before dawn.
All the rich men in the world want to get shot into outer space. Richard Branson. Jeff Bezos. Elon Musk. The new explorers. To get the hell out of here and see if they—and maybe we—can exist somewhere else for a while. It's the story of the century. We want to know if the pocket of the universe can be turned inside out. We're either going to bring all the detritus of the world upward with us or we're going to find a brand-new way to exist. The cynical say that it's just another form of colonization—they're probably right, but then again maybe it's our only way out.
The Winklevosses have booked their tickets—numbers 700 and 701—on Branson's Virgin Galactic. Although they go virtually everywhere together, the twins want to go on different flights because of the risk involved: Now that they're in their mid-thirties, they can finally see death, or at least its rumor. It's a boy's adventure, but it's also the outer edge of possibility. It cost a quarter of a million dollars per seat, and they paid for it, yes, in bitcoin.
Of course, up until recently, the original space flights all splashed down into the sea. One of the ships that hauled the Gemini space capsule out of the water in 1965 was the Intrepid aircraft carrier.
The Winklevosses no longer pull their boat up the river. Instead they often run five miles along the Hudson to the Intrepid and back. The destroyer has been parked along Manhattan's West Side for almost as long as they have been alive. It's now a museum. The brothers like the boat, its presence, its symbolism: Intrepid, Gemini, the space shot.
They ease into the run.
submitted by thegrandknight to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[uncensored-r/Bitcoin] The Great Bitcoin Bull Market Of 2017 by Trace Mayer

The following post by bitcoinknowledge is being replicated because some comments within the post(but not the post itself) have been silently removed.
The original post can be found(in censored form) at this link:
np.reddit.com/ Bitcoin/comments/7fyhbw
The original post's content was as follows:
By: Trace Mayer, host of The Bitcoin Knowledge Podcast.
Originally posted here with images and Youtube videos.
I just got back from a two week vacation without Internet as I was scouring some archeological ruins. I hardly thought about Bitcoin at all because there were so many other interesting things and it would be there when I got back.
Jimmy Song suggested I do an article on the current state of Bitcoin. A great suggestion but he is really smart (he worked on Armory after all!) so I better be thorough and accurate!
Therefore, this article will be pretty lengthy and meticulous.
BACKGROUND
As I completely expected, the 2X movement from the New York Agreement that was supposed to happen during the middle of my vacation flopped on its face because Jeff Garzik was driving the clown car with passengers willfully inside like Coinbase, Blockchain.info, Bitgo and Xapo and there were here massive bugS and in the code and miners like Bitmain did not want to allocate $150-350m to get it over the difficulty adjustments.
I am very disappointed in their lack of integrity with putting their money where their mouths are; myself and many others wanted to sell a lot of B2X for BTC!
On 7 December 2015, with Bitcoin trading at US$388.40, I wrote The Rise of the Fourth Great Bitcoin Bubble. On 4 December 2016, with Bitcoin trading at US$762.97, I did this interview:

As of 26 November 2017, Bitcoin is trading around US$9,250.00. That is an increase of about 2,400% since I wrote the article prognosticating this fourth great Bitcoin bull market. I sure like being right, like usual (19 Dec 2011, 1 Jul 2013), especially when there are financial and economic consequences.
With such massive gains in such a short period of time the speculative question becomes: Buy, Hold or Sell?
FUNDAMENTALS
Bitcoin is the decentralized censorship-resistant Internet Protocol for transferring value over a communications channel.
The Bitcoin network can use traditional Internet infrastructure. However, it is even more resilient because it has custom infrastructure including, thanks to Bitcoin Core developer Matt Corrallo, the FIBRE network and, thanks to Blockstream, satellites which reduce the cost of running a full-node anywhere in the world to essentially nothing in terms of money or privacy. Transactions can be cheaply broadcast via SMS messages.
SECURITY
The Bitcoin network has a difficulty of 1,347,001,430,559 which suggests about 9,642,211 TH/s of custom ASIC hardware deployed.
At a retail price of approximately US$105/THs that implies about $650m of custom ASIC hardware deployed (35% discount applied).
This custom hardware consumes approximately 30 TWh per year. That could power about 2.8m US households or the entire country of Morocco which has a population of 33.85m.
This Bitcoin mining generates approximately 12.5 bitcoins every 10 minutes or approximately 1,800 per day worth approximately US$16,650,000.
Bitcoin currently has a market capitalization greater than $150B which puts it solidly in the top-30 of M1 money stock countries and a 200 day moving average of about $65B which is increasing about $500m per day.
Average daily volumes for Bitcoin is around US$5B. That means multi-million dollar positions can be moved into and out of very easily with minimal slippage.
When my friend Andreas Antonopolous was unable to give his talk at a CRYPSA event I was invited to fill in and delivered this presentation, impromptu, on the Seven Network Effects of Bitcoin.
These seven network effects of Bitcoin are (1) Speculation, (2) Merchants, (3) Consumers, (4) Security [miners], (5) Developers, (6) Financialization and (7) Settlement Currency are all taking root at the same time and in an incredibly intertwined way.
With only the first network effect starting to take significant root; Bitcoin is no longer a little experiment of magic Internet money anymore. Bitcoin is monster growing at a tremendous rate!!

SPECULATION
For the Bitcoin price to remain at $9,250 it requires approximately US$16,650,000 per day of capital inflow from new hodlers.
Bitcoin is both a Giffen good and a Veblen good.
A Giffen good is a product that people consume more of as the price rises and vice versa — seemingly in violation of basic laws of demand in microeconomics such as with substitute goods and the income effect.
Veblen goods are types of luxury goods for which the quantity demanded increases as the price increases in an apparent contradiction of the law of demand.
There are approximately 16.5m bitcoins of which ~4m are lost, ~4-6m are in deep cold storage, ~4m are in cold storage and ~2-4m are salable.
(http://www.runtogold.com/images/lost-bitcoins-1.jpg)
(http://www.runtogold.com/images/lost-bitcoins-2.jpg)
And forks like BCash (BCH) should not be scary but instead be looked upon as an opportunity to take more territory on the Bitcoin blockchain by trading the forks for real bitcoins which dries up more salable supply by moving it, likely, into deep cold storage.
According to Wikipedia, there are approximately 15.4m millionaires in the United States and about 12m HNWIs ($30m+ net worth) in the world. In other words, if every HNWI in the world wanted to own an entire bitcoin as a 'risk-free asset' that cannot be confiscated, seized or have the balance other wise altered then they could not.
For wise portfolio management, these HNWIs should have at least about 2-5% in gold and 0.5-1% in bitcoin.
Why? Perhaps some of the 60+ Saudis with 1,700 frozen bank accounts and about $800B of assets being targetted might be able to explain it to you.
In other words, everyone loves to chase the rabbit and once they catch it then know that it will not get away.
RETAIL
There are approximately 150+ significant Bitcoin exchanges worldwide. Kraken, according to the CEO, was adding about 6,000 new funded accounts per day in July 2017.
Supposedly, Coinbase is currently adding about 75,000 new accounts per day. Based on some trade secret analytics I have access to; I would estimate Coinbase is adding approximately 17,500 new accounts per day that purchase at least US$100 of Bitcoin.
If we assume Coinbase accounts for 8% of new global Bitcoin users who purchase at least $100 of bitcoins (just pulled out of thin error and likely very conservative as the actual number is perhaps around 2%) then that is approximately $21,875,000 of new capital coming into Bitcoin every single day just from retail demand from 218,750 total new accounts.
What I have found is that most new users start off buying US$100-500 and then after 3-4 months months they ramp up their capital allocation to $5,000+ if they have the funds available.
After all, it takes some time and practical experience to learn how to safely secure one's private keys.
To do so, I highly recommend Bitcoin Core (network consensus and full validation of the blockchain), Armory (private key management), Glacier Protocol (operational procedures) and a Puri.sm laptop (secure non-specialized hardware).
WALL STREET
There has been no solution for large financial fiduciaries to invest in Bitcoin. This changed November 2017.
LedgerX, whose CEO I interviewed 23 March 2013, began trading as a CFTC regulated Swap Execution Facility and Derivatives Clearing Organization.
The CME Group announced they will begin [trading in Q4 2017 Bitc...
submitted by censorship_notifier to noncensored_bitcoin [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: dashpay top posts from 2016-03-30 to 2017-03-29 23:35 PDT

Period: 364.11 days
Submissions Comments
Total 1000 8178
Rate (per day) 2.75 22.40
Unique Redditors 282 978
Combined Score 18856 18752

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 2923 points, 178 submissions: tungfa
    1. Dash Version 12.1 Release (48 points, 15 comments)
    2. Dash iOS Wallet back on iTunes ! (40 points, 18 comments)
    3. The biggest Russian off-line crypto-exchange has started working with DASH (38 points, 0 comments)
    4. Dash added to cryptocurrency derivative trading platform BitMEX (33 points, 19 comments)
    5. - - Dash 0.12.1.4 - - (Minor Update - No Sentinal Changes - Not mandatory but "encouraged to update”) (32 points, 5 comments)
    6. 100 hrs after Dash 12.1 Launch = 98% - 100% Miner Support ! (32 points, 16 comments)
    7. Jaxx Blockchain Wallet now supports Dash ! (31 points, 3 comments)
    8. Bitfinex now opened margin trading for Dash (30 points, 11 comments)
    9. Dash's Ryan Taylor at TNABC Bitcoin Miami 2017 (30 points, 11 comments)
    10. DASH Business Development Strategy Update - FEB 2017 (29 points, 15 comments)
  2. 2730 points, 119 submissions: Amanda_B_Johnson
    1. Apple. We're Digital Currency Experts Now. (65 points, 25 comments)
    2. DASH’s. Best. Day. Yet. | DASH: Detailed (62 points, 31 comments)
    3. 'We're Doing the Planning That Takes Us to 1 Billion" - Ryan Taylor, Dash Director of Finance (53 points, 40 comments)
    4. Why Aren't We Seeing Greater Adoption of Cryptocurrency? [Bountied reading of Ryan's TNABC presentation] (50 points, 17 comments)
    5. Is There a Maximum Coin Supply in Dash? | DASH: Detailed (40 points, 10 comments)
    6. Amanda to Present Evolution at Anarchapulco's “Cryptopulco” (39 points, 9 comments)
    7. 12.1.4 Coming | WoC in China | The Ol' Hold-Steady -- DASH: Detailed (37 points, 17 comments)
    8. EVERYTHING You Need to Know About Dash in Under 3 Minutes! (37 points, 3 comments)
    9. Something DASHOUS This Way Comes (37 points, 17 comments)
    10. Welcome, newcomers. Here are some resources for ya! (37 points, 10 comments)
  3. 652 points, 30 submissions: Basilpop
    1. Roger Ver is bombarded with lies about Dash's "weak privacy". Let me destroy that allegation... (49 points, 36 comments)
    2. Dash just broke 70 Million US Dollar Marketcap first time in its history! (40 points, 5 comments)
    3. PSA: "SPORK_8_MASTERNODE_PAYMENT_ENFORCEMENT": true (33 points, 5 comments)
    4. A Call For Kraken To Add Dash For Trading | Open Letter to Jesse Powell, CEO at Kraken (28 points, 7 comments)
    5. Dash is now the 4th largest cryptocurrency in the world - Just shot past Litecoin (28 points, 7 comments)
    6. Dash has surpassed Litecoin in transaction volume (27 points, 6 comments)
    7. Why Dash Dislodged Ethereum Classic From Number 6 Place On CoinMarketCap (27 points, 3 comments)
    8. Welcome new users! Let's have an AUA (Ask Us Anything) - We will answer all your questions so fire away! (25 points, 71 comments)
    9. [IMPORTANT] DON'T just download and install the new client. You must follow the instructions! (24 points, 16 comments)
    10. Official Dash Core 12.1 Evolution Upgrade Thread (23 points, 14 comments)
  4. 495 points, 21 submissions: goto1415
    1. I did my first @Dashpay payment yesterday. I moved $100K for ~0.3 cents, and was confirmed in the next block. Bitcoin used to work that well - Roger Ver on Twitter (87 points, 23 comments)
    2. Dash #3 in Marketcap - just getting started... (47 points, 53 comments)
    3. Big Bitcoiners see the advantages of Dash (38 points, 26 comments)
    4. Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Dash Cryptocurrency w Amanda B Johnson (31 points, 3 comments)
    5. Dash Altcoin Continues Epic Bull Run; Sets Several All-Time Records - Bitcoinist.com (30 points, 0 comments)
    6. To Celebrate $100 Mark, DASH: Detailed Goes Live (29 points, 6 comments)
    7. Monero Vs. Dash, Simple Comparison (27 points, 23 comments)
    8. Bitcoin entrepreneur Charlie Shrem joins the Dash Slack. (24 points, 3 comments)
    9. Dash hits $100. Will it overtake Bitcoin? (19 points, 5 comments)
    10. Op Ed: A Closer Look Into DASH (Part 1) (19 points, 6 comments)
  5. 462 points, 21 submissions: Dashriprok
    1. Why Dash is the Most Sybil Attack-Resistant Cryptocurrency (44 points, 11 comments)
    2. Dash @ $25.23 and just past Monero for the Number 5 spot. (34 points, 10 comments)
    3. Dash to partner with BlockCypher (34 points, 0 comments)
    4. Goldmoney Accepts Dash for Purchasing Gold (31 points, 4 comments)
    5. Dash breaks $24 (27 points, 39 comments)
    6. Dash teams up with BlockPay to enable point of sale purchases in over 36 countries (26 points, 0 comments)
    7. Dash now available to Buy or Sell at "Wall of Coins" (25 points, 4 comments)
    8. Dash partners with Major exchange gains access to FIAT trading (24 points, 2 comments)
    9. Charlie Shrem Sponsors Dash MasterCard (21 points, 3 comments)
    10. Dash at 2017 North American Bitcoin Conference (Edited Version) (21 points, 12 comments)
  6. 450 points, 32 submissions: notmyby
    1. Proposal: Core Team Expansion (23 points, 5 comments)
    2. June 2016 Monthly Budget Report (22 points, 0 comments)
    3. Proposal: Business Development - Major Exchange (22 points, 13 comments)
    4. Dash Is Hiring: Front-end Developers (19 points, 3 comments)
    5. Proposal: Core Team Salaries (April) (19 points, 5 comments)
    6. Proposal: Marketing & Communication (April) (19 points, 0 comments)
    7. Proposal: Dash Offices at ASU's SkySong Innovation Center (17 points, 0 comments)
    8. Proposal: Hardware Wallets For Build And Test (16 points, 0 comments)
    9. Proposal: WebEx Premium Subscription (16 points, 2 comments)
    10. Proposal: Conferences & Travel - The North American Bitcoin Conference (14 points, 0 comments)
  7. 366 points, 25 submissions: dashpaymagazine
    1. John MCAfee meets DashNDrink - Closer shot (25 points, 0 comments)
    2. Shakepay Dash Cards: An Interview With Jean Amiouny (22 points, 4 comments)
    3. Dash with InstantSend, A New Name But The Same Ground Breaking Technology (20 points, 1 comment)
    4. Dash’s DAO At 10 Months: a Progress Report by Amanda B.J (19 points, 0 comments)
    5. Jaxx Provides A Disguise as Dash gets on iOS? (17 points, 2 comments)
    6. The DashCast Ep.02 – Interview with Amanda B. Johnson (17 points, 1 comment)
    7. Bitcoin, Dash and Litecoin Analysis (July 5) | Crypto Technical (16 points, 6 comments)
    8. Dash Scam Alert: Dash-wallet.com (16 points, 4 comments)
    9. Dash Representation At D10e San Francisco 2016 (Presentations, Time, Date, Where To Watch) (15 points, 2 comments)
    10. Dash’s PrivateSend: What makes Digital Cash Fungible (15 points, 1 comment)
  8. 350 points, 13 submissions: TrustThyself
    1. Bitcoin's Bubble vs. Dash's Killer App: Amanda B. Johnson at UNM (41 points, 23 comments)
    2. Will Cryptocurrency Ever Get Its Killer App? Amanda B. Johnson presents at Anarchapulco (41 points, 6 comments)
    3. Network Switch, General Bytes, & Testnet Slots | DASH: Detailed (39 points, 1 comment)
    4. 12.1 Support Party, Apple-Jaxx Update, & International Girls | DASH: Detailed (38 points, 6 comments)
    5. Dash Did Not Move Inverse to Bitcoin's Rocket This Week... Interesting (29 points, 1 comment)
    6. The Dash Network is Worthy of Attack! | DASH: Detailed (28 points, 5 comments)
    7. Dash Open House March 30th at SkySong with Ryan Taylor, Evan Duffield & Amanda B. Johnson. All are invited! (26 points, 4 comments)
    8. It's Q4 2016, So Where Is Bitcoin's Consumer Demand? -- Dash on Nasdaq (26 points, 7 comments)
    9. Dash Open House this Thursday in Scottsdale, AZ! (22 points, 4 comments)
    10. DASH: Detailed Investor Report #4 (20 points, 4 comments)
  9. 344 points, 20 submissions: itscrazybro
    1. Now that Apple has approved Monero, we can throw away the suspicion that we were not approved due to privacy concerns (34 points, 34 comments)
    2. Bitcoin Realises it's Centralised as Dash Votes on its Monthly Direction (27 points, 7 comments)
    3. At this rate, Dash now has a monthly budget of $120,000 USD! (26 points, 3 comments)
    4. Another article on Nasdaq, good work Wachsman PR (23 points, 1 comment)
    5. Cryptocurrencies that pay a dividend (20 points, 0 comments)
    6. Dash Releases Software Upgrade in Sweeping Redesign (20 points, 0 comments)
    7. Completing our transition to becoming a digital currency company (not just a Bitcoin company) (18 points, 5 comments)
    8. Just sold the remainder of my Bitcoin (18 points, 15 comments)
    9. I knew Evolution was a game changer but now I have experienced why it is! (17 points, 5 comments)
    10. Spend Dash – Dash's very own business directory is now online (17 points, 5 comments)
  10. 334 points, 20 submissions: TaoOfSatoshi
    1. Vitalik Buterin discusses Dash governance in The Huffington Post (31 points, 9 comments)
    2. Announcing the "Dash: The Cash Alternative" campaign! (29 points, 18 comments)
    3. Dash Nation Call To Action: RT for Dash Jaxx! (27 points, 4 comments)
    4. Reality Check: Tao Responds To Tone Vays And FluffyPony (27 points, 45 comments)
    5. CATV | Dash: More Than A Currency, It's The Beginning Of A Global Movement (22 points, 14 comments)
    6. Dash on the App Store? Currency to be integrated into Jaxx Wallet next week! (18 points, 0 comments)
    7. Dash Nation Slack reaches 700 members! (16 points, 3 comments)
    8. That's right, Roger! Dash's features are Ver-y Cool! (16 points, 7 comments)
    9. At last! At last, Dash appears on the App Store through Jaxx Wallet integration (15 points, 0 comments)
    10. Dash Update - Evan Duffield speaks about LaBitConf (14 points, 0 comments)
  11. 284 points, 13 submissions: NibiruHybrid
    1. Congrats to Amanda & Pete For Reaching 10K YouTube Subs!!!! (47 points, 4 comments)
    2. Amanda B. Johnson DASH Interview The Crypto Show Anarchapulco 2017 (26 points, 4 comments)
    3. Roger Ver list of BTC competitors he diversified into for better privacy & cheaper transaction costs DASH (25 points, 12 comments)
    4. The DASH community has sponsored MMA Fighter Davis Dos Santos for his fight at TKO MMA 38 (24 points, 13 comments)
    5. Dash, BlockPay produce POS option (23 points, 1 comment)
    6. Dash: The new Cryptocurrency player with more Features than Bitcoin - Amanda Johnson (22 points, 6 comments)
    7. Dash Partners with BlockPay to Enable Point of Sale Purchases at Brick and Mortar Stores (21 points, 0 comments)
    8. Dash Is Now the Fourth Biggest Cryptocurrency with $200m Market Cap | Finance Magnates (18 points, 6 comments)
    9. Live Chat Dash Guest Interview By Crypt0 With Amanda B. Johnson (18 points, 14 comments)
    10. Dash Market Report: DASH/BTC Sets All Time High of $74.34 (17 points, 2 comments)
  12. 277 points, 15 submissions: solowhizkid
    1. DASH Cryptocurrency Explodes To New Highs (34 points, 7 comments)
    2. Dash Is Now the Third Biggest Cryptocurrency by Market Cap - Israel News (34 points, 1 comment)
    3. Dash Partners with BlockPay, Enables PoS Payments at Physical Stores (31 points, 1 comment)
    4. Transaction to 12.1 complete, with first 12.1 superblock issued #dash_force (20 points, 2 comments)
    5. Keepkey-integrates-dash (19 points, 4 comments)
    6. Dash, the most Sybil attack resistant crypto (17 points, 2 comments)
    7. Is DASH The Future Of Cryptocurrency? (16 points, 4 comments)
    8. My Best Investment in 2017? A Dash (Digital Cash) Masternode Earned Trading Bitcoin on Poloniex? (15 points, 0 comments)
    9. Alex-ru educating and presenting Dash - Digital money for global use. (In Russian) (14 points, 0 comments)
    10. Dash to beat bitcoin (14 points, 1 comment)
  13. 210 points, 5 submissions: adiiorio
    1. Dash has joined the Jaxx family (Official Announcement) (65 points, 35 comments)
    2. Anthony Di Iorio on Twitter - "Apple just called. They want Dash removed from Jaxx. Only some coins are authorized for App Store. We're determining course of action." (45 points, 50 comments)
    3. Jaxx invites Dash to the party, previews multi-stage integration (42 points, 17 comments)
    4. Jaxx - Dash integration coming soon! (Official Announcement) (37 points, 10 comments)
    5. Dash comes to iPhone with Jaxx wallet - International Business Times (21 points, 1 comment)
  14. 191 points, 14 submissions: cryptobubble
    1. DASH/CNY pair added to BTC38.com! (18 points, 1 comment)
    2. Dash, the anonymous evolution of Bitcoin, Interview with Evan (17 points, 0 comments)
    3. Jaxx Wallet Set to Integrate DASH This Week (15 points, 0 comments)
    4. The Spells of Genesis trading card dedicated to Dash will be released today! (15 points, 3 comments)
    5. Richtopia's List of Top 100 Blockchain Organisations by Influence, Dash #47! (14 points, 0 comments)
    6. SpectroCoin adding Dash to exchange and e-wallet (14 points, 1 comment)
    7. D10e Conference Featuring John McAfee Fast Approaching (13 points, 0 comments)
    8. Node40 HowTo Guide: Edit your local Dash masternode.conf file (13 points, 0 comments)
    9. Node40 streamlines blockchain network incentivization (13 points, 0 comments)
    10. ‘DashnDrink’: Dash-Powered Vending Machine Returning for d10e (13 points, 1 comment)
  15. 188 points, 10 submissions: eric_sammons
    1. Review of the Dash Budget System, the First Blockchain-based Decentralized Governance System (26 points, 11 comments)
    2. Apple vs. Dash: The Importance of Privacy (25 points, 10 comments)
    3. The Dash Masternode Network: A Response to Critics (23 points, 6 comments)
    4. An Honest Assessment of Dash, Today’s Hottest Cryptocurrency (22 points, 10 comments)
    5. Fulfilling Satoshi’s Vision (21 points, 3 comments)
    6. Bitcoin is Sick. Will It Heal, Be Amputated, or Die? (Dash mentioned) (17 points, 2 comments)
    7. Historical Data added to DashVoteTracker.com (16 points, 2 comments)
    8. Dash: A Digital Cash System - Bitcoinist.net (15 points, 6 comments)
    9. Out of the Cryptocurrency Sandbox (14 points, 2 comments)
    10. Shifting to Cryptocurrency (9 points, 1 comment)
  16. 168 points, 10 submissions: ashmoran
    1. An under-recognised advantage of Dash over Bitcoin: it pays its own developers (24 points, 3 comments)
    2. Why running a Dash masternode is different from Bitcoin mining (22 points, 10 comments)
    3. Success to the Successful (or: why the moon is not far enough) (19 points, 24 comments)
    4. Dash as investment opportunity for Chinese savers (18 points, 14 comments)
    5. What open source Bitcoin project would you like to see ported/upgraded for Dash? (18 points, 16 comments)
    6. SegWit politics in Litecoin demonstrates why Dash's masternode voting is superior to miner voting for deciding protocol changes (16 points, 9 comments)
    7. Marketing the Dash treasury to Bitcoin project developers (15 points, 21 comments)
    8. The injustice of market cap rankings: The DAO features above Dash despite the fact The DAO does not work. Discuss :-) (14 points, 8 comments)
    9. FlokiNET: Privacy-conscious VPS provider based in Iceland who accept Dash (12 points, 4 comments)
    10. Is Dash susceptible to the "bad faith taker spy" attack to any degree? (10 points, 7 comments)
  17. 162 points, 7 submissions: bmed4u
    1. Jaxx: "Apple has accepted Dash into their App Store as an "approved" cryptocurrency" (65 points, 20 comments)
    2. Dash is far from dying (25 points, 25 comments)
    3. Dash's network has never been so secure! New ATH (1.29TH/s) (19 points, 8 comments)
    4. Welcome to our new masternode owners! New ATH= 4235 (16 points, 1 comment)
    5. Alphabay and mass adoption reputation (13 points, 7 comments)
    6. Bitcoin: They are starting to get why it is so important to incentivize nodes! (13 points, 2 comments)
    7. Dash network is able to take care of Bitcoin's transactions (11 points, 5 comments)
  18. 145 points, 6 submissions: cryptoninjas
    1. Dash now added to crypto exchange Bitfinex (49 points, 45 comments)
    2. Dash now out of beta goes LIVE on crypto hardware wallet KeepKey (28 points, 2 comments)
    3. Euro based crypto broker BitPanda integrates Dash (25 points, 8 comments)
    4. Russian largest bitcoin exchange MaRSe adds Dash (23 points, 9 comments)
    5. Bitcoin powered trading platform Whaleclub adds DASH/BTC with 3x leverage (10 points, 0 comments)
    6. GENERAL BYTES new BATMTwo Bitcoin ATMs now shipping, supports DASH (10 points, 0 comments)
  19. 142 points, 3 submissions: dashingtomars
    1. DASH Market Cap Surpasses LTC (73 points, 27 comments)
    2. DASH Breaks $30 (56 points, 51 comments)
    3. EU Parliament states Virtual Currencies cannot be anonymous (13 points, 17 comments)
  20. 138 points, 5 submissions: evand82
    1. 12.1 Announcement / Finalized Date / Project Update (47 points, 19 comments)
    2. Update on 12.1 (32 points, 6 comments)
    3. April 2016 Budget Proposal (21 points, 4 comments)
    4. Please upgrade your testnet masternodes! - 12.1 (21 points, 0 comments)
    5. Enforcement is enabled (17 points, 1 comment)
  21. 120 points, 6 submissions: alex9xxl
    1. Here's Johnny! (34 points, 15 comments)
    2. New ATH DASH/BTC! Give up Bitcoin! (32 points, 30 comments)
    3. Dash to $100 (0.08 BTC) till the end of the day? (19 points, 34 comments)
    4. Bitfinex Adds Market Trading For Dash (Again) (14 points, 9 comments)
    5. Poloniex security notice (12 points, 1 comment)
    6. Buying Dash for investment purposes (9 points, 19 comments)
  22. 116 points, 7 submissions: fearofhellz
    1. The Jaxx Wallet Now Includes Support for Dash (32 points, 2 comments)
    2. Mycelium Wallet Will Support Buying And Selling Dash (22 points, 3 comments)
    3. TigoCTM Adds Dash Support To its Cryptocurrency ATM Network (16 points, 1 comment)
    4. DASH Continues Upward Trend Across Bitcoin and Monero Markets (13 points, 0 comments)
    5. Dash Developers Focus On Fiat Gateways And Partnerships – The Merkle (12 points, 3 comments)
    6. Jaxx Developers Hint At Upcoming DASH Integration (11 points, 3 comments)
    7. DASH Price Remains Resilient Despite Lackluster Trading Volume – The Merkle (10 points, 1 comment)
  23. 116 points, 3 submissions: Hillscent
    1. Dash moves up to number 6! (52 points, 18 comments)
    2. From 100% Bitcoin to 75% Bitcoin 25% Dash (34 points, 17 comments)
    3. New All Time High Market Cap for Dash (30 points, 17 comments)
  24. 114 points, 8 submissions: SilentLennie
    1. Chris Dunn: Currency Competition & The Future Of Money (with Amanda B. Johnson) (25 points, 12 comments)
    2. Dash Youtube channel: Dash is Financial Privacy (17 points, 0 comments)
    3. The Cryptoverse: How Tax Law Applies to DASH and Masternode Operators In USA (The Cryptoverse #237) (13 points, 1 comment)
    4. 24h high is over US $100 on WorldCoinIndex (12 points, 2 comments)
    5. Dash gained the most of the top currencies the past 7 days, let's hope it continues that way (12 points, 3 comments)
    6. Genesis Mining has run out of X11 (DASH mining) (12 points, 3 comments)
    7. Why Amanda B. Johnson loves Dash (12 points, 48 comments)
    8. Dash is the solution to Bitcoin problem of privacy and speed. (11 points, 0 comments)
  25. 114 points, 5 submissions: coinwatch
    1. Dash price broke $16 (34 points, 3 comments)
    2. Oh my $51!! (27 points, 21 comments)
    3. Dash reaches all time high of $29 (26 points, 12 comments)
    4. Dash price hits $15 (15 points, 0 comments)
    5. Dash sets all time high of $39 (12 points, 4 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. Basilpop (1541 points, 524 comments)
  2. Amanda_B_Johnson (1285 points, 577 comments)
  3. ashmoran (480 points, 194 comments)
  4. Bitcoin_Chief (368 points, 142 comments)
  5. tungfa (367 points, 204 comments)
  6. wackyD1982 (313 points, 147 comments)
  7. SilentLennie (281 points, 134 comments)
  8. thedesertlynx (281 points, 102 comments)
  9. IronVape (258 points, 84 comments)
  10. MasterMined710 (251 points, 164 comments)
  11. TaoOfSatoshi (250 points, 108 comments)
  12. thesleepthief (229 points, 86 comments)
  13. __technoir__ (222 points, 56 comments)
  14. Pink-Fish (211 points, 109 comments)
  15. TheDashGuy (189 points, 81 comments)
  16. taushet (185 points, 72 comments)
  17. davebazzel (185 points, 64 comments)
  18. newhampshire22 (175 points, 57 comments)
  19. stealth923 (163 points, 39 comments)
  20. Dashriprok (156 points, 61 comments)
  21. dashtipbot (151 points, 141 comments)
  22. NibiruHybrid (150 points, 50 comments)
  23. MrNotSoRight (148 points, 72 comments)
  24. adiiorio (138 points, 32 comments)
  25. Technologov (132 points, 51 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. Why dash REALLY exploded in price by ChooseAgodAndPray (94 points, 85 comments)
  2. I did my first @Dashpay payment yesterday. I moved $100K for ~0.3 cents, and was confirmed in the next block. Bitcoin used to work that well - Roger Ver on Twitter by goto1415 (87 points, 23 comments)
  3. DASH Market Cap Surpasses LTC by dashingtomars (73 points, 27 comments)
  4. Dash has joined the Jaxx family (Official Announcement) by adiiorio (65 points, 35 comments)
  5. Apple. We're Digital Currency Experts Now. by Amanda_B_Johnson (65 points, 25 comments)
  6. Jaxx: "Apple has accepted Dash into their App Store as an "approved" cryptocurrency" by bmed4u (65 points, 20 comments)
  7. DASH’s. Best. Day. Yet. | DASH: Detailed by Amanda_B_Johnson (62 points, 31 comments)
  8. (Pre-Proposal) DASHPayCard - DASH Branded Debit Card + Fiat/Dash Integration by Bitcoin_Charlie (61 points, 36 comments)
  9. DASH Breaks $30 by dashingtomars (56 points, 51 comments)
  10. Dash hits $100 by SatoshiRoshi (54 points, 55 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 30 points: deleted's comment in Welcome new users! Let's have an AUA (Ask Us Anything) - We will answer all your questions so fire away!
  2. 24 points: Bitcoin_Chief's comment in Tone Vays predicts that someone is going to hack and take all of the dash out of the masternodes(1:18:30).
  3. 24 points: EncryptionPrincess's comment in 'Ask ABJ!' -- Amanda Answers 18 Questions From Viewers
  4. 24 points: Jaxx_adiiorio's comment in Jaxx on Twitter: "This weekend we're giving away 200 DASH ($2400US), to participate have Jaxx installed (all but iOS) & @Dashpay wallet active. More into to come."
  5. 22 points: COHthebestRTS's comment in 18 Dollar Hype!
  6. 22 points: __technoir__'s comment in 'We're Doing the Planning That Takes Us to 1 Billion" - Ryan Taylor, Dash Director of Finance
  7. 22 points: stealth923's comment in Tone Vays predicts that someone is going to hack and take all of the dash out of the masternodes(1:18:30).
  8. 21 points: Stereoscopic_Salute's comment in Where are you coming from newcomers?
  9. 20 points: Basilpop's comment in Yea baby, congrats for the $100M market cap!
  10. 20 points: wsmithston's comment in With current price Dash's budget allows us to hire 70 developers/testers with 120k$/year salary. No other cryptocurrency can achieve this level of independence from third parties (like Blockstream in BTC).
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats (Donate)
submitted by subreddit_stats to subreddit_stats [link] [comments]

BTCK 197 - Kraken CEO Jesse Powell about being the largest Bitcoin exchange Crypto Idle Miner Giveaway! - Earn Real Money Mining Cryptocurrency On Your Iphone & Android! WCHangout 16 -- CEO Jesse Powell w/ Kraken --Features, Functionality & Trader Focused Products Bitcoin Miner Software Bitcoin Miner Pro Blockchain Hack Kraken’s Jesse Powell Says Bitcoin (BTC) Will Exceed $100K This Cycle  Huge Influx of New Traders

Hedge Funds, Retail Investors Bought the Dip — Kraken CEO Jesse Powell. According to Kraken crypto exchange CEO Jesse Powell, there has been a massive influx of new accounts from all types of investors. The trend coincides with Bitcoin’s strong recovery from $3,600 to over $9,000. — Jesse Powell (@jespow) ... Crypto Miner Maker Canaan Announces $10 Million Share Buyback. Blockchain Stablcoin Tether (USDT) Launches on High-Speed Blockchain ‘Solana’ Most Read. Bitcoin Bounces Back Once Again, This Time From the $9,900 Level. 5 Sep 2020 U.S. Dollar’s Bounce and Risk-on Mood Hurting Gold and Bitcoin in the Short Term. 3 Sep 2020 Bitcoin in Limbo Until Thursday’s ... At the time, the company’s founder Jesse Powell is said to have offered the trading desk manager a salary of USD 150,000 with a verbal agreement of 10% commission of the trading desk’s annual profit, according to the suit filed in New York on 4 April. Kraken CEO Jesse Powell of the largest cryptocurrency exchange in the world discusses many different aspects of scalability in the cryptocurrency industry. The 202,000 bitcoins held by the MtGox trustee are not being distributed mainly because of Peter Vessenes. Jobs available at Kraken. Bitcoin Knowledge. To help you better understand Bitcoin the top people in the Bitcoin industry are ... Bitmain Antminer S9 13.5 Th/s Bitcoin Miner Great Condition ... Category: Jesse Powell Crypto Exchange Kraken Takes a Cue from Binance, Delists Bitcoin SV. April 17, 2019 MrCrypto. By CCN: Add Jesse Powell to the chorus of crypto exchange CEOS who are done with Craig Wright’s games. San Francisco-based crypto exchange Kraken has announced that it will be delisting Bitcoin SV (BSV), following ...

[index] [40056] [2395] [20518] [8154] [20968] [21378] [35405] [45263] [12422] [7223]

BTCK 197 - Kraken CEO Jesse Powell about being the largest Bitcoin exchange

Jesse Powell: How Kraken Accelerates Cryptocurrency Adoption Bitcoin 2020 ALL AP INFO TECH 53,524 watching Live now Noob's Guide To Bitcoin Mining - Super Easy & Simple - Duration: 11:37. In a June 16 interview with Bloomberg, Kraken CEO Jesse Powell claimed that layer-2 solutions will in time make Bitcoin ( BTC ) as easy to use as the United States dollar. In addition to ... Jesse Powell: How Kraken Accelerates Cryptocurrency Adoption Bitcoin 2020 ALL AP INFO TECH 48,843 watching Live now How to Make Money on YouTube Without Making Videos (Weird Niche) - Duration: 28:27. Jesse Powell: How Kraken Accelerates Cryptocurrency Adoption Bitcoin 2020 ALL AP INFO TECH 49,900 watching Live now The first 20 hours -- how to learn anything Josh Kaufman TEDxCSU - Duration ... Jesse Powell: How Kraken Accelerates Cryptocurrency Adoption Bitcoin 2020 ALL AP INFO TECH 54,764 watching. Live now ; Copy & Paste Videos and Earn $100 to $300 Per Day - FULL TUTORIAL (Make Money ...

#